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Restoration for the health of the Gallatin

Restoration for the health of the Gallatin

How we (literally) get to the Gallatin impacts the health and sustainability of riparian areas, streamside habitat, vegetation, and the river in general.  Well-worn, and sometimes rogue, access points are prevalent within publicly accessible forest lands along the Gallatin, creating the need for a host of restoration options.

Recreation and the River: How we Co-Exist with a Healthy Gallatin

Recreation and the River: How we Co-Exist with a Healthy Gallatin

We all know that the Gallatin River has so much to offer. On top of its breathtaking beauty and critical habitat, our watershed is known for its world-class fly-fishing, rafting, and abundant access to scenic hikes through the Custer-Gallatin National Forest....

Upper Deer Creek Restoration Underway

Upper Deer Creek Restoration Underway

As part of the Gallatin River Task Force’s multi-year access restoration project, construction will begin on Upper Deer Creek August 31, 2020.

Prioritizing Restoration

Prioritizing Restoration

The upper Gallatin River is famous for its easy access. From the Yellowstone National Park boundary to the mouth of Gallatin Canyon, anglers, rafters, and kayakers enjoy almost 40 miles of public waterway and riverbank—but this convenience is not without consequence....

Fall Work Completed at Moose Creek Recreation Area

Fall Work Completed at Moose Creek Recreation Area

Work to stabilize streambanks and improve river access began at Moose Creek Flat recreation area in October 2017. The first phase of the Moose Creek restoration project, including the boat ramp, kayak launch, trails, and streambanks restoration, was completed in Fall 2017. Additional streambank restoration and fencing will be completed in Spring 2018.

First River Access Improvement Project Breaks Ground at Moose Creek

First River Access Improvement Project Breaks Ground at Moose Creek

Work to stabilize streambanks and improve river access has begun at Moose Creek Flat day use area. Restoration work at Moose Creek is the first of many projects lead by the Gallatin River Task Force and the Custer Gallatin National Forest that will enhance access and safety for river users and restore riparian habitat along the Gallatin corridor.

How to Harvest Willow Cuttings to Restore Streambanks

How to Harvest Willow Cuttings to Restore Streambanks

The West Fork Project requires thousands of willow cuttings. Vertical “stakes” will be planted to enhance wetland areas and anchor bioengineering materials while horizontal “layers” will be installed directly into the rebuilt streambanks. Here are some tips for harvesting willow cuttings to increase survival rate and project success.

Seven Takeaways from Streambank Stabilization Workshop

Seven Takeaways from Streambank Stabilization Workshop

The Gallatin River Task Force staff attended a Streambank Stabilization Workshop hosted by the Madison Conservation District (CD) and facilitated by Jo Christensen, United States Forest Service. The workshop combined classroom time with a work project on the Jack Creek. Here are seven new things we learned about streambank stabilization.

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